Class critique

September 4, 2009

Much like my comments from my blog “Breathe”, I am overwhelmed keeping up with my fellow student’s blogs.  When I first began reading them, I would scan quickly through their thoughts, ideas and move on to the next blog.  However, now that people’s personalities are connected with their blogs, and interesting topics abound, questions and ideas expressed, I  want to read what each person has taken the time and effort to write about; I want to respond; I want to think; I want to view the linked information; I want to do a comparison-contrast of my mindset within the paradigm of this class.  Thus I find myself up until all hours of the night reading.  What if the class restricted enrollment?  Would that allow for more concentrated efforts of dialogue between students about their blogs?  Or would it fall short on the topics and ideas front, keeping students less interested or connected?

The book is a bit on the dry end of my preferred reading scale.  It’s not until I get to the end of the chapters and start thinking through by answering the questions that I really gain much from it.  Well, that’s not true, I appreciate going to the different links — mostly printed in the side columns.  On-line education is exciting … a chameleon changing all the time morphing to it’s surroundings — it can be text, images, video presentations, etc.  It just seems like the book should be a bit more excited about it’s topic.

I like the ‘tools’ we’re utilizing (like TappedIn).  I wasn’t keen on blogging at first; I didn’t feel like anyone should be subjected to my boring thoughts on purpose; but I love reading other people’s blogs.  However, now I’ve come to enjoy it because it forces me to really put some time and effort in, and not glance over the readings/writings.

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2 Responses to “Class critique”

  1. Nathan Says:

    “What if the class restricted enrollment? Would that allow for more concentrated efforts of dialogue between students about their blogs? Or would it fall short on the topics and ideas front, keeping students less interested or connected?”

    The class does have a restricted enrollment. We blew thru that cap the week before class started. Myself, I’ve taught the class with as few as 12 and, frankly, the interaction isn’t as good.

    My goal is to have something new for every body to read just about any time they look. Which fills the queue pretty quickly for people who don’t look very often 🙂

  2. Deborah Robbins Says:

    “On-line education is exciting … a chameleon changing all the time morphing to it’s surroundings”

    I love this description. It’s a perfect description of technology in general. I really enjoyed reading this post. I found the class blogs to be more boring in the beginning. Now that we are past all the intro. stuff, the blogs have gotten much more interesting. I also find myself up all hours of the night reading them. Although I’m a bit behind right now.


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